Microsoft Office Home and Student 2007 [Old Version]

Microsoft Office Home and Student 2007 [Old Version]

Microsoft Office Home and Student 2007 [Old Version] Editor’s Rating:
List Price:$ 149.95
Sale Price:[wpramaprice asin=”B000HCZ8EO”]

Microsoft Office System

Product Description

May be installed on up to three non-commercial home computers.Please note that even though it is not noted on the box, Microsoft Office Home and Student 2007 is compatible with Windows 7

Microsoft Office Home and Student 2007 is the essential software suite for home computer users and includes 2007 versions of Excel, PowerPoint, Word, and OneNote. This system enables you to quickly and easily create great-looking documents, spreadsheets, and presentations, and organize your notes and

Details

  • Essential software suite for home computer users makes it a pleasure to complete schoolwork and other tasks
  • Includes 2007 versions of Excel, PowerPoint, Word, and OneNote
  • Intuitive user interface that exposes commonly used commands; updated graphics and formatting galleries help you to easily produce high-quality documents
  • Work with confidence and security thanks to the improved automatic Document Recovery tool and the Document Inspector tool, which removes personally identifiable information from your document
  • Enhanced Help system includes online tutorials with step-by-step instructions; includes OneNote, a digital notebook that helps you gather, organize, and search many types of information in one place

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Security Update for Microsoft Office 2007 failed, Can someone help?

Security update for Microsoft Office system 2007 (KB951808)
” The detection failed, this can be due to a corrupted instillation database.”

I tried to install this one again because it last installed on my laptop on 8/23/08 and newer udates have been failing to install for the past 5 months.
What am I going to have to do to get these microsoft updates to install?
how do i find firefox on my options?

Microsoft Office System best answer:

Answer by cyber_toltec_cat
I had this problem in the past !

This is Malware, deeply rooting itself in your system (some even hide in your router’s firmware). Virus scanners and the Restore Point Utility are not good things to use against such invasion for this reason alone.

Get the programs I listed from another computer (Internet Café, Public Library or friend’s computer) onto a USB stick as Malware blocks you from downloading protection. A word of caution, be sure to read all programs help files completely before using them. If you still cannot use MBAM, rename it Alteregobytes to confuse the Malware (but be sure to keep the .exe extension on it) and use it as alternative for part A of the following solution.

Trying MBAM alone is not enough as you need a COMPLETE solution, here is one (use programs in the order stated):

A) Download MBAM (MalwareBytes’ Anti-Malware): http://www.download.com/Malwarebytes-Anti-Malware/3000-8022_4-10804572.html?part=dl-10804572&subj=dl&tag=button – Install the application and make sure a checkmark is placed next to Update Malwarebytes’ Anti-Malware and Launch Malwarebytes’ Anti-Malware, then click Finish ( If an update is found, it will download and install the latest version ).

Once the program has loaded, select “Perform Quick Scan”, then click Scan ( The scan may take some time,so please be patient ). When the scan is complete, click OK, then Show Results to view the results. Make sure that everything is checked, and click Remove Selected ( When disinfection is completed, a log will open in Notepad and you may be prompted to Restart ).

B) Try the tricks and free programs I use: 1) Clean browsers junk.

Method One (now): In Internet Explorer (IE), click the Tools menu, then Delete Browsing History and in the box, click the Delete all button (bottom left) and Yes.
In Firefox (FF), go to tools, clear private data, make sure all boxes are checked and then click on the clear private data now button.

Method Two (Normal use: Every 14 days – Heavy use: Every 7 days): In IE, click the Tools menu, Delete Browsing History and in the box that opens, do these: a) click the button near Temporary Internet Files, click Yes and wait for the box that opens to close.
b) click the button near History, click Yes and wait for the box that opens to close and finally, click the close button (bottom right) to finish.

In FF, Go to tools, clear private data and uncheck all except Browsing History, Cache and Authenticated Sessions boxes then click on the clear private data now button.

Note: Close browser when done to clear cookies still in memory. For other browsers or versions of the programs, check help files for guidance on doing cleanup.

2) Turn off the restore point utility ( Guide for XP: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/310405 and Vista: http://windowshelp.microsoft.com/Windows/en-US/Help/9f6d755a-74bb-4a7d-a625-d762dd8e79e51033.mspx )

3) Use this free cleaner: http://www.glaryutilities.com/gu.html to remove junk and remnants files.

4) put order in your HD with a “Disk defragmenter”.

5) Turn restore point utility back on. (see part 2)

6) Do not use Google/Yahoo toolbars (spyware).

7) Persisting problem after this, get Avira: http://www.download.com/Avira-AntiVir-Personal-Free-Antivirus/3000-2239_4-10322935.html?cdlPid=10901492 plus an Email scanner ( http://www.spamdel.com/ OR http://www.glenn.delahoy.com/software/files/Inbox.htm ). Already have a scanner, make sure your virus database is updated BUT stay away from (or get rid of) AVG free (CRAP).

8) If the problem is very stubborn and you have a router, visit its web site and check for firmware that is more recent than your version. If FOUND, download and install, if NOT, use the router’s reset switch, both methods return it to factory settings. “WARNING”: Gather router install CDs, guides, passwords before doing this as you will need to do all connections again.

By doing so, you are on your way to being well protected BUT never relax your guard !

ODC2008: 2008-02-11 Keynotes
Microsoft Office System
Image by orcmid
Among other topics and a question-and-answer session, Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates also spoke to the ways in which the Microsoft Office System is evolving as a platform.

Microsoft Vs. Medium: A Tale Of Two Office Cultures

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In the flood of stories about Steve Ballmer's time at the helm of Microsoft, a troubling symbol of the company's office culture keeps emerging. It's called "stack ranking," a system that had corrosive effects on Microsoft employees by encouraging …

3 Comments

  1. 805 of 836 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    The license covers three home machines, April 30, 2007
    By 
    Graham (Palo Alto, CA) –

    This review is from: Microsoft Office Home and Student 2007 [Old Version] (Software)

    The “Home and Student” license is for non-commercial use only. The product requires activation, which includes sending machine identification information to Microsoft.

    The good news is that the license allows installation on up to three machines and (over time) you can transfer the license to new systems.

    From the license: “You may install one copy of the software on three licensed devices in your household for use by people who reside there. … During activation, the software will send information about the software and the device to Microsoft. … You may reassign the license to a different device any number of times, but not more than one time every 90 days.”

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  2. 887 of 944 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Major upgrade for Office, February 25, 2007
    By 
    pm444 “pm444” (Okemos, MI USA) –

    This review is from: Microsoft Office Home and Student 2007 [Old Version] (Software)

    While Office 2003 offered a refreshed look and some improvements in functionality, the basic structure remained the same. While veteran users were able to easily navigate the familiar menus, it had become increasingly difficult to locate some features (for instance, in Word, would you find “insert new rows” to a table in the “insert” or “table” menu?).

    With Office 2007, Microsoft offers the “ribbon”, a new and more intuitive way to access features that we used to find in the menus. While the features are basically the same, they are now grouped together according to when and how you would normally use them. These groupings are accessed by clicking on tabs, which are organized in the order you’d use them. The best way to get a better understanding of this change is to check out the screenshots, or download a free trial version of Office from Microsoft. While Office 2007 was released at the same time as Vista, you do not need Vista in order to run it. The program ran fine on my Windows XP laptop, which only had 512 MB of RAM, and it runs even better on my Vista laptop with 2 GB of RAM.

    As for which version of Office to buy, this is the third time I’ve opted for the Home and Student version (which has had other names in previous releases, but is still being sold for $149). I need Word, Excel, and PowerPoint, and this is the most cost-effective way to get those programs. I was disappointed that Microsoft dropped Outlook from the Home and Student version. In order to continue to use Outlook, I installed Outlook 2003 and haven’t had any problems.

    Instead of Outlook, you get OneNote, a program that uses notebooks and tabs to save and organize all sorts of files and documents. I haven’t had much time to play with OneNote yet, but the more I use it, the more impressed I am with it. It looks like one of those programs that you can personalize to meet your own needs and not have to fight with it to get it to do what you want.

    This is a significant upgrade and should allow all users, new and experienced, to work more efficiently and quickly.

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  3. 197 of 208 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Let’s reconcile all those good and bad reviews…, September 15, 2007
    By 
    John Robertson (Phoenix, AZ) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Microsoft Office Home and Student 2007 [Old Version] (Software)

    Well, it’s been a week now, and while I still have Office 2002 (virtually identical to 2003) and Office 2007 on my laptop, I’ve pretty much stopped using 2002. I give ’07 a thumbs up.

    I have used Office since 1994 for just simple letters and spreadsheets until the last year, where I started becoming a heavy user of some really odd features, like non-standard line spacing, different headers within the same document, embedded Excel sheets in a Word doc, embedding images in headers and footers, charting, tables, etc. I was worried if all these newly discovered features that I just learned would suddenly disappear in the changing ribbon that everyone was talking about.

    Despite using weird features, or maybe because of it, I am a little more tolerant of looking up how to do things. But I didn’t want to relearn everything, and I haven’t had to. The default blank document has tabs for Home, Insert, Page Layout, References, etc, which really are not much different than the categories in the classic drop-down menus. Once clicking on these tabs, you are offered the same choices as before…charts, insert picture, bookmarks, wordart, etc., and a few new ones, like references, balloons and highlighting, footnotes, and more. It IS a different layout, but to this point, I don’t think it ever took me more than 10 seconds to find something.

    I’m surprised no one is talking about the ability to save documents in .pdf (what was once exclusive to Adobe). I know other software has allowed this for sometime, but the ability to make a document that will launch in Adobe Reader with all the functionality of Word or Excel is something I’ve been waiting for. In 2 years, we’ll all wonder how we did without it. This is important to me because once in .pdf, the formatting is locked in, and won’t change depending on how it’s previewed or printed.

    Another thing that is important is the new, modern looking charts and tables. This isn’t just the ‘pretty’ factor, but more effective to understanding lots of data more easily. Office 2000/2002/2003 just looked old and unimpressive. It’s true that Microsoft is just catching up to Apple, Adobe and others, but they’ve at least done it. Equally important is the ability to instantly see changes to formatting before you’ve committed it to the whole document. I’ve probably wasted a month’s time over the course of the last year reformatting documents to do it a better way. If only I authored them in 2007, which was available a year ago, I would have saved so much time.

    One reviewer said his Home/Student version “did not have all the features as the full version”. I’ve tried to investigate this, and as far as I can tell, Home/Student’s versions of Word/Excel/Powerpoint are no different than any other version.

    I don’t want to get too personal here, but all the reviewers who are angry that their saved homework or important business document was saved in .docx and therefore was not readable by anyone else really are just wanting to be victims. Office 2007 makes it abundantly clear that you will be saving in .docx, and if you don’t want to, you don’t have to. It tells you how and where to save it as a compatible .doc file (or .xls, etc.) and whether you want this as your default setting. I’m sorry, but if you’re a student and you ignore all those messages, I think you’re going to have more problems in school than using this version of Office.

    The Grammar check seems to be improved, catching problems that my Office 2002 did not. Hot keys like Ctrl K for hyperlinks or Ctrl C to copy all still work. I’m not sure if they removed others as some reviewers have said, but so far it has not affected me. The concept of Add-Ins (plugins) is a little bit annoying, as to get certain features like the ability to save .pdf requires you go online and install the add-in. Then again, this gives Microsoft the ability to add features from time to time (hopefully they’ll use it that way – I think a big reason for add-ins is to give Microsoft a way of periodically checking your software to ensure it’s legal). I also like the always-on word count, something that Amazon probably wishes I would use in my reviews.

    I’m at day 7 and counting, and I don’t feel much reason to ever open my Office 2002 again.

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