Microsoft Office Home and Student 2013 (1PC/1User) [Download]

Microsoft Office Home and Student 2013 (1PC/1User) [Download]

Microsoft Office Home and Student 2013 (1PC/1User) [Download] Editor’s Rating:
List Price:$ 139.99
Sale Price:[wpramaprice asin=”B00B1TGUMG”]

Microsoft Office System

Product Description

Office Home & Student 2013 is designed to help you create and organize faster with new, time saving features and a clean, modern look. Office Home & Student 2013 Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and OneNote on one PC. Office Home & Student 2013 is designed to help you create and organize faster with time saving features and a clean, modern look. Plus, you can save your documents in the cloud on SkyDrive and access them when you are not at home. What’s new in this release of Office?The 2013 versions

Details

  • Product download occurs on Office.com. Details about the download process are listed below.
  • The latest versions of Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and OneNote.
  • One time purchase for the life of your PC; limited to one “licensed computer” at a time and transfer eligibility restrictions apply.
  • NOTE: Does not include Publisher, Access, or Outlook.
  • NOTE: Windows XP and Vista NOT supported. This product requires Windows 7 or newer operating systems.

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Can my laptop run without Microsoft Office system?

I have 2007 Microsoft Office system on my laptop. It came with the laptop when I received it, but it’s taking up 502.00MB and I don’t use it. Is it possible for me to uninstall without any problems? If I do uninstall it, will I be able to reinstall it again?

Microsoft Office System best answer:

Answer by deanyourfriendinky
Yes and No.

Yes. Your laptop will run quite happily without Microsoft Office installed.

Yes. it is possible for you to uninstall Microsoft Office without any problems.

Yes, with a proviso. If you restore your computer to factory new condition, your trial version of Microsoft Office will be restored as well. Otherwise, after the trial period has expired, you will not be able to install (and run) the trial version of Microsoft Office again — that is, using legitimate methods. (Although, you could pay for the license or go out and buy Microsoft Office.)

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7 Comments

  1. The manufacturer commented on the review belowSee comments
    844 of 891 people found the following review helpful
    1.0 out of 5 stars
    Say goodbye to an economical MS Office (now TRIPLE the price), January 31, 2013
    By 
    D. Graves “Fine Books and More” (Portsmouth, New Hampshire) –
    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)
      
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Microsoft Office Home and Student 2013 (1PC/1User) [Download] (Software Download)

    I have never been a Microsoft hater, as many are. But the love is certainly gone. Welcome to the beginning of the end of an economical Office purchase (with one exception, which I’ll get to later).

    Ready to get your new 2013 Home & Student with 3 licenses? Forget about it: they’re gone forever. Pay Microsoft your $140 and they will give you a THIRD of what they used to give you for that price: 1 license, not 3.

    It gets worse: Are you familiar with Microsoft’s big push for “Office 365”? Get familiar with it because this is the last time you will even be able to “buy” Office: you RENT Office 365, you don’t own it. It’s a subscription service. And it is the future of Office. Don’t like the fact that you now have to pay $280 for your desktop and notebook copies of Office (or $420 for 3 licenses)? Say hello to $100 PER YEAR for Office 365. And that will be at LEAST $400 if you use it for more than 3 years.

    The one positive aspect of 365 is that it covers up to 5 PC’s, so a family will probably save money on the deal. However, if you are single or a couple with 2 or 3 computers, you will pay at least $300 over the average 3-year lifespan of an Office edition. Go one day over 3 years (requiring a 4th-year subscription) and it’s $400. For something you paid $125 or so for until now (Office 2010 H&S with 3 licenses was $125).

    Yes, I’m giving Microsoft 1 star: Forget about the merits of Office 2013, it’s the greed and manipulative practices of Microsoft that need to be exposed here. One day in the not-too-distant future Microsoft will make sure “owned” editions of Office (perpetual licenses) will not work with new editions of Windows (e.g., Windows 10) so that you MUST subscribe to 365. Worse, you will have to ALWAYS subscribe if you want to read and edit your Word or Excel docs, use OneNote, etc.: the apps are DISABLED the minute your subscription lapses. This IS their plan. So, I encourage others to give Office 2013 a 1-star review to voice your displeasure over this 200% price increase and Microsoft’s nefarious plans on making Office an extortion racket (they will be able to demand higher and higher 365 fees because you can’t say no – unless you’re willing to lose years worth of documents).

    P.S. One other reason to hate this change in Office: the one license you get is now machine-specific, tied to that machine ID upon install. If that computer dies or if you decide to get a new PC, you now must buy another copy of Office: no migrating/transfering allowed anymore. Another $140. Nice.

    —————————————————
    ADDENDUM 5 May 2013

    Many who loathe the idea of renting Office have asked, ‘Do I abandon Office and find a free suite [OpenOffice, etc.] now, or wait until I’m forced into Office 365?’. Well, just so you know, MS recently announced that it will continue to support Windows 7 to at least 2020, probably longer. That means that if you have Office 2010 or 2013 and run either W7 or W8, your owned (perpetual license) Office product will run fine until probably 2025 or later, as long as you keep W7 or 8 as your OS (and, who knows, perhaps Windows 9 will be compatible as well). If you have Office 2007 or earlier, I would get my hands on a 2010 with 3 licenses, pronto. There’s nothing earth-shatteringly special about 2013 and many hate it compared to 2010, even aside from the pricing/licensing nonsense.

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  2. stem
    The manufacturer commented on this review(What’s this?)
    Posted on

    Apr 2, 2013 2:23:08 PM PDT

    Dear D. Graves,

    Thank you for your feedback and sorry for the inconvenience. Effective immediately, we have changed the licensing terms to allow you to transfer the software from one computer to another. We made this decision based on your feedback and the feedback of other customers who asked for additional flexibility in this area. For more information, please visit http://bit.ly/Xr8OPk

    -The Office Team

     
  3. 195 of 207 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Good, but not a significant step forward from Office 2010, February 2, 2013
    By 
    F

    This review is from: Microsoft Office Home and Student 2013 (1PC/1User) [Download] (Software Download)

    About a month ago, I installed Windows 8 and the final version of Office 2013 on a Dell XPS 13. A bit about me: I’m a graduate student and a long-time user of Microsoft Office. I’ve used Word, Excel, Powerpoint and OneNote almost every day for the past 5 years, but OneNote the most by far. I’ve used every version of Office since 1997.

    As other reviewers have pointed out, the biggest changes to Office 2013 from Office 2010 are SkyDrive integration, touch gestures, and a flatter UI to match Windows 8. Since I don’t use SkyDrive often, don’t have a touchscreen, and am indifferent to the flatter look, I’ll leave those aspects to other reviews. If you’re like me and aren’t particularly excited by SkyDrive (which still isn’t as versatile as Google Docs for real-time collaboration), then Office 2013 is practically the same as Office 2010 in terms of how everything works – most of the time. This is not a bad thing, at least in my opinion, since I really liked Office 2010 and its improved Ribbon UI.

    What I wanted to talk about here are the changes that Microsoft has made to Office 2013 from Office 2010 that I’ve noticed, changes that might impact daily workflow for users upgrading from previous Office versions.

    OneNote 2013:
    —————
    I spend at least 4 hours a day in this program, so I’ll start with this. As far as I can tell, there are no significant changes in terms of features. Buttons on the ribbon are shuffled around a bit, but the feature set is still the same, as is the file container (*.one) and notebook type (“OneNote 2010-2013”).

    However, there are 5 new issues that annoy me every single day.
    (1) Full screen and pinning the ribbon. In 2013, going into full screen mode means that everything is hidden, except for a very short horizontal bar across the top of the screen. To access anything on the ribbon, I have to click on this bar to show the ribbon first. If I want to pin the ribbon so that tabs are visible at all times in full screen mode, I have to click on this bar, click a menu button near the minimize button (also hidden in full screen), and then click Show Tabs. However, OneNote does not remember this setting. Thus, every time I exit full screen mode or restart OneNote and then reenter full screen mode, I have to re-pin the ribbon again. On an ultrabook, I want more space for taking notes, but I also use the ribbon extensively and would prefer to have it available. This problem did not exist in OneNote 2010, which remembers the user’s full-screen ribbon settings.
    (2) Inserting multi-page printouts. The new default behavior in OneNote 2013 is to place each page of the printout on a separate “page” of the notebook. I prefer to put one entire lecture on each “notebook page”, regardless of how many pages or slides the professor gives us. I’ve also never come across anyone who prefers to have only one printout page on each notebook page. So for instance, if I were inserting a 30-slide Powerpoint, OneNote 2013 would create 30 new notebook pages. There is an option to turn this off in the options, but OneNote then shows a dialog box asking me to choose between the two options every time I want to insert a printout. Since I insert several files a day, this gets annoying very quickly. Once again, OneNote 2010 did not have this problem.
    (3) Inserting more than 1 multi-page printout on the same notebook page. If I try this, then the second printout is somehow inserted under the first printout, i.e. the first printout overlaps and covers up the second printout. It only happens when the printouts are both at least several pages long or if I’ve annotated the page already; the program disregards my cursor location. To work around this, I have to put the second printout on a new notebook page and then copy/paste the printout pages back to the first notebook page. This problem also did not exist in OneNote 2010.
    (4) Zoom level changes when inserting printout: it always defaults back to 100%. I take notes at 115% on my ultrabook, so every time I insert a printout, I have to readjust the zoom level.
    (5) Drawing tools. I have no idea how Microsoft managed to mess this up when going from 2010 to 2013, but half the time I try to draw an arrow, it ends up being a line with a V in the middle, or the arrowhead is completely detached from the line. In fact, I can’t even draw a plain line properly sometimes. I haven’t tried the other shapes much, but I wouldn’t be surprised if there were problems there too. I’ve given up and resorted to drawing arrows freehand with the pen tool instead.

    These issues may seem minor to some, but they affect me every day, so I wanted to give a heads-up to anyone else who uses OneNote the same way I do. I wish that Microsoft had spent more time implementing useful features (e.g. still can’t rotate or crop a printout; search results are still clunky) or at least providing options to change these new…

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  4. The manufacturer commented on the review belowSee comments
    85 of 87 people found the following review helpful
    1.0 out of 5 stars
    Customer Service sucks!, February 17, 2013
    By 
    babs

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Microsoft Office Home and Student 2013 (1PC/1User) [Download] (Software Download)

    I bought this and downloaded it on my computer. A week later that computer basically died so I had to get a new one. They won’t reset my code and are insisting I spend another $140 TO BUY IT AGAIN. I had to wait 2 hours on the phone and online to be told no. I am beyond frustrated at them.

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  5. stem
    The manufacturer commented on this review(What’s this?)
    Posted on
    Apr 2, 2013 2:24:41 PM PDT

    Dear Babs,

    Thank you for your feedback and sorry for the inconvenience. Effective immediately, we have changed the licensing terms to allow you to transfer the software from one computer to another. We made this decision based on your feedback and the feedback of other customers who asked for additional flexibility in this area. For more information, please visit http://bit.ly/Xr8OPk

    -The Office Team

     

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